GASTHAUS: got 'kraut?

Louisville's ONLY German Restaurant

Oct 6th: Happy German American Day

Today we celebrate Germans immigrating to the United States!!

 

German American Day

German-American Day (German: Deutsch-Amerikanischer Tag) is a holiday in the United States, observed annually on October 6. The holiday, which celebrates German American heritage, commemorates the date in 1683 when 13 German families from Krefeld, near the Rhine, landed in Philadelphia.

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October 6, 2017 Posted by | History, Uncategorized | , , , | Leave a comment

Karneval !!!

Dear blog readers!  

This next week is an eventful week in Germany !! The Carneval season has kicked in high gear all over Germany with its parades, masquerades, foolish behaviors and colorful festivities.

Carneval, or Karneval as it’s spelled in German, officially starts on November 11 at 11:11 am when Karneval Comittees start organizing the activities for the “Fifth Season.”  The date and time for the start of Karneval has long-standing historic significance in that the number “11” is one number more than the 10 Commandments and one number less than the 12 Diciples of Christ. During the Middle Ages the number eleven was considered the number of Fools.

Would it be of surprise to us that one of our own was born on such date? Nico Greipel, the youngest, was actually born on that date.

But while Karneval officially starts in November no one really notices any activity until the last Thursday before Lent (which was yesterday, Feb. 11).

The first sign of foolishness appears that Thursday, also called “Weiberfastnacht”, or Fat Thursday .  That day is rather hard to explain, all I remember was when we were young girls we’d cut off pieces of boys’ shoe laces and often try to snip off some piece of our teacher’s ties (that never worked, but I recall getting a teacher’s shoe lace once).

If you want to get an idea of Fat Thursday activities, watch this video here.

The next big day is Rosen Montag, which is a day of parades, TV Shows, heavy drinking (surprise here) and more wacky costumes.  Generally, the televised parades feature large, colorful floats that poke fun at politicians.  The candy that gets thrown from these floats is called “Kamelle” and people often try to use the inside of umbrellas to catch them.

Schools are closed on that Monday. The cities with the most activity and biggest parades have traditionally been Mainz (which is Louisville’s sister city), and the Cologne area, which includes city of Düsseldorf.

The carneval greeting in Mainz is Helau and in Cologne is Alaaf.

But it is all over on Ash Wednesday with the start of Lent.

Until then HELAUUUUU, and ALAAAAAF!!

February 12, 2010 Posted by | German, History | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Big News

raffleflyerFREE DESSERT!!!!

On Thurday, December 18, 2008 we are celebrating our 15 th anniversary!!! Please come and join us.  Each diner will get a free dessert.*

*no Strawberry Napoleons will be available that day, reservations are strongly recommended.

December 17, 2008 Posted by | Event, Food, History, News | Leave a comment

The Lady of The Haus

Diggin’ through some old pictures we found one made around 1963 of Annemarie, far left, outside of London Heathrow Airport after she attended a course by BEA (the former British European Airways). She was a travel agent at that time. She said the reason she wasn’t looking in the camera was because she was checking out a pilot walking by. Good to know! But can anyone guess which of her kids resembles her the most? Post your ideas here!mom_restaurant.jpg

February 11, 2008 Posted by | Family, History | 3 Comments

more details…

Just a few more details for you to enjoy. Happy weekend!
gasthaus-tiles23.jpg

January 25, 2008 Posted by | Family, German, History | Leave a comment

It’s all in the details

gasthaus-tiles1.jpg

The statement “It’s all in the details”, is evident when you come to our restaurant. Over the years we have added little pieces of decor giving the restaurant a more personal touch. Most of these items are straight from Germany and some have a very special family history.
Guests often ask us about the teddy bears placed in the lattice of the large house. Some are gifts from friends and some of them have been our toys…way back when.


Stay tuned, there’s more.

January 24, 2008 Posted by | Family, German, History | 1 Comment

   

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